What Your Employment Contract Should Contain?

Posted by on Sep 24, 2016 in Business Litigation | 0 comments

After successfully passing the job interview and getting hired, the next step in getting employed is the contract signing. The contract serves as a binding agreement between you and your future employer. This document is crucial in establishing future and continuing relationship between the employee and the employer. According to the website of Slater Pugh, Ltd. LLP, the contract lays down clear responsibilities as well as liabilities for everyone.

As an employee, it is important that you have an understanding of the terms of your contract. BY doing so, this will help prevent any disputes and conflicts between the signing parties. Generally, contracts have express and implied terms. The former refers to elements of your contract that have been mentioned or agreed upon orally by both the employer and the employee. These include the amount you will be paid, working hours, holiday and sick pay, and notice period for ending the contract.

Implied terms, on the other hand, can be implied into most employee contracts. For instance, that you would not steal from your company or divulge confidential information. Implied terms also include the provision on safe working environment. The terms may also be implied through custom and practice.

Aside from the terms, your contract should generally include your employment status. This is different from your working pattern which could either be part-time, fulltime, casual, zero hours, temporary, or seasonal. During the contract signing, it is important that you carefully read the terms and conditions of your contract before signing. If there is something that you do not agree with or believe is unfair, you can always discuss it with your employer.

As mentioned, the contract is legal and binding and any party who breaks what is stipulated can be held liable. Any contract disputes should first be sorted out by the parties concerned. Employee litigation can be costly for both employee and employer so the issue should first be resolved by the parties themselves.

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